9.04.2005

Hobbyists

A Snarling challenges Miss Snark about her post on POD and hobby writers:

How would you define a hobbyist?

It's easier to tell you when you are NOT. Herewith:


1. You have an agent; OR

2. You have sold work, for cash money, to a publisher who is not your mother and the work is available in brick and mortar stores with an ISBN number and Library of Congress cataloging information; AND

3. You file, or will file for this year, a Schedule C form with your taxes that shows income and expenses from your business of writing; AND

4. You've invested time and planning in your writing career by attending workshops, graduate school or professional development seminars and workshops, or by subscribing to, or reading professional publications like PW, Kirkus, Library Journal, Miss Snark's blog.

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

I don't think you can logically use the conjunction AND before criterion number 4.

None of 4 is necessary.

Miss Snark's quintessentiallity aside, surely, many if not most writers don't partake of the "writerly" culture of workshops, writing pedagogy, and trade journals.

carper said...

I don't think you can logically use the comma after 'surely.'

carper said...

But carping aside, I agree. Professional writers by and large spend their time writing. Seminars, workshops, writing groups, etc, are more the realm of the dilettanti.

ali said...

Guess that makes me a hobbyist. If carper and anonymous are right, I've still a long way to go before professionalism!

Bernita said...

Ali, maybe it makes us hobbits, not hobbyists.

christine said...

Yeah, I will have # 2 by the end of this year, and hopefully (if the book sells well) #3 next year, but I don't plan on #4... they're just out of my price range right now, especially with the price of gas. Unless I sell REALLY well and can attend the SCBWI conference in NY in the spring. That I'll go to.

How about online workshops? Or crit groups, like Critters or critiqecircle.com? Do those count? Have you seen how much a sub to PW is??? Of course you have, but it's WAY expensive for those of us NOT with big advances or with big houses.
But I read MS's blog, so I'm OK there.

Jill said...

There's learning style to take into consideration as well. Those of us (like myself) who are visual learners cannot BEAR to sit and listen to someone yammer on at a conference. It's akin to slow suffocation. (Seriously. I feel like I'm going to implode if someone talks too long.)

But give me a well-written blog, a well-written book, or a super-helpful, online critique group, and I'm all over it!

Jill said...

lol Bernita...

One needs hairy feet, too, then.

Anonymous said...

I would give negative points for using Critique Circle.

Christine said...

LOL. I've never used CC personally, I used Critters. Very helpful.
I think you should amend this MS, to include not only pro mags, but also recommended writing books, like Self-Editing. seeking out books to better one's writing is just as good, if not better than going to a conference. IF you take the time to research which books are going to help the most and which are drivel.

ali said...

I could handle being a hobbit :D! Just get me some plastic feet...

Dawno said...

I'm working my way up from #4 and would like to know: Does Barnes & Nobel U count? And "Learn Writing with Uncle Jim" at AbsoluteWrite? I've got the Miss Snark's blog part done...

Dawno said...

dang - Noble, not Nobel.