11.30.2005

Don't Kick Serendipity in the Keister

O wondrous Snarkalicious one, I got an email this afternoon from a Very Large Agency who pretty much said, "We're still looking at your book-- is that all you have? Do you have anything set in Japan, where you grew up?" My first reaction was, "Ohmigod they might want to see more of my writing!" which was quickly followed by, "Huh?"I don't want to look a gift horse in the mouth, because I'm honestly so thrilled that they gave me a second thought in this crazy world that I'm speaking in cliches, but I only mentioned in my bio that I used to live in Japan. It wasn't like I said, "I lived in Japan! Ask me how!" Naturally, I responded to them immediately offering up what they wanted to know, but I'm still wondering at this. Why in the wold would they ask for something so specific?


Cause five minutes ago an editor asked for something like that and three minutes ago they realized they didn't have it "in stock". This happens more than you think.

This is also called being in the right place at the right time. Don't miss the opportunity.

I read Karin Muller's JAPANLAND: A Year in Search of Wa this summer. Japan is getting to be a very hot topic.

7 comments:

Anatidaeling said...

Speaking of set in Japan, Mean-ass librarian recommends:
_My Year of Meats_ by Ruth Ozeki (Viking, 1998)[Gosh, 1998? Is it really that old? It seems newer to me. Anyway, still a wonderful, funny, set-in-contemporary-Japan read. Remind me a little of _Lost in Translation_, except that I didn't really like that movie, but I LOVED this book]

Moi said...

I had that happen to me. I'd sent in a letter, chapters & synopsis in to an editor mentioning that the inspiration for this story had been to "correct" something in a classic tale. The response was to reject what I'd sent, but asking me to send in the full ms of the classic retelling. So, I sat down and wrote out exactly what they were asking for and sent it in.

The publisher then LOST the manuscript they'd requested and finally admitted it to my after 18 months after I sent them with a change of contact info note. LOL!

Ah, the hidden joys of publication. ;)

Justin R. Buchbinder said...

I blame the up-and-coming Memoirs of a Geisha for that surge in literary activity... out of curiousity, Miss Snark, what other ODD requests have you heard from editors recently? Stories of two vampires and the dog they lost? Futuristic Food Novels? This is something I would find interesting.

I.J.Parker said...

I certainly hope you're right about this huge interest in Japan.:)

Brady Westwater said...

Japan is big - but China is going to be far bigger. If you have any history there - start pitching!

E. Dashwood said...

This makes me recall "Lost in Translation." But did that set the trend, or was it riding it?

Sophia Coppola shows that there are second acts in American culture. Who woulda thunk she would return in such triumph after Godfather III?

Richard Lewis said...

Well, I live in Indonesia. Bali, to be precise. My agent is still waiting for phone calls from editors wanting material from Bali...