11.26.2005

Notes? what notes?

I've heard a very well published author (100 some books) say that if you disagree with an editor or agent's notes, just disregard them, send the book back in a few months, and they'll never know the difference.Apparently, he was not talking about Miss Snark.


Or any agent with a brain.

The idea we won't recognize something, even just a glimmer of familiarity, after we've read it and given notes is pretty insulting. Besides, why would you do this? Does anyone think that what I thought was slow and poorly written in January is going to suddenly be fast paced and enticing in June? Not even Miss Snark drinks that much in the summer.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

I think when they wrote 'they'll never know the difference', they don't mean the agent won't recognise the ms as one they've read, but that they won't recognise that the changes recommended haven't been made... I'm sure Miss Snark disagrees with this too, but it's a different point than was responded to...
And Miss Snark knows perfectly well that she doesn't give detailed notes re. anything which she thinks is 'slow and poorly written'... Something which is 'almost there' is a different animal.

Anonymous said...

I'm the guy, only very slightly misquoted, who provided the subject for this pointless exchange. What I actually said was that I had done it-- twice--sent back the identical original manuscript with a note saying: "Great suggestions! Thanks!" And the editor's comment was something like, "Aren't you glad you listened to me?" Not suggesting that the average editor would fall for such a thing...but one does run into the below-average ones.

Anonymous said...

Same person, commenting on his own comment: I just remembered that I also had a book accepted when I sent it to an editor who had refused it a year before. Nothing he said suggested he remembered having already seen it--and I considered it prudent not to say anything either. Stories like this serve no purpose.