12.21.2005

Rebinding companies

Miss Snark, can you explain how rebinding companies work?
Thanks!


Actually, I have no clue. I had to look up "rebinding" to find out it was the process of creating the binding you see on school books and "library bound" books. I've never dealt with that side of the business. Miss Snark strikes out...sorry!

9 comments:

Brady Westwater said...

My one experience with rebinding was when a friend of mine who had three books published in paperback - and never in hardcover, always lamented that fact. So one Chirstmas I had copies of her three books rebound as hardcovers and gave them to her.

Mainly, though, as Miss Snark said, rebinding is to fix worn schoolbooks and rebind paperback books so they can be used as library books.

Bonnie Calhoun said...

I had an old favorite Bible rebound because the old binding had deteriorated, but that's my only experience.

Carter said...

Check with your local public library. They will usually send anything you want bound with their orders, which can save you a bunch of money.

Rowan said...

The University of Toronto has plenty of rebound books. Not only for repair (quite common) but for collecting the periodicals. The magazines would be bound in groups (depending on thickness) and shelved that way. It made it easy to search for stuff and kept them in good condition. The engineering alumni association also did stuff with artsy books, Hall of Distinction kind of stuff. It seems to be the equivalent of the automotive 'aftermarket' business.

Maria said...

We send books out from the library all the time for rebinding. Some of the cheaper bound hardbacks and graphic novels hold up to about 3 readings. (Pages fall out especially if they are only "glue bound")

If the margins are large enough (the white space in the center) we send books to a binding company that rebinds them (usually using the sewn method) A new hardcover is put on them. You can find rebound books in any library. The covers are generally plain black, white, green or blue. On the side in gold or white embossing, you'll find the title. Sometimes we save the cover and it can be used (I think they use heat to meld it onto a certain type of cover.) For our library, paperbacks are rarely rebound. For one, there isn't enough margin. For two, they may have already lost pages or the pages were damaged along with the cover.

Visit a printing press page and look up how they bind their books and you'll learn a lot about the binding process. A lot of small presses will do rebinding also.

Maria said...

We send books out from the library all the time for rebinding. Some of the cheaper bound hardbacks and graphic novels hold up to about 3 readings. (Pages fall out especially if they are only "glue bound")

If the margins are large enough (the white space in the center) we send books to a binding company that rebinds them (usually using the sewn method) A new hardcover is put on them. You can find rebound books in any library. The covers are generally plain black, white, green or blue. On the side in gold or white embossing, you'll find the title. Sometimes we save the cover and it can be used (I think they use heat to meld it onto a certain type of cover.) For our library, paperbacks are rarely rebound. For one, there isn't enough margin. For two, they may have already lost pages or the pages were damaged along with the cover.

Visit a printing press page and look up how they bind their books and you'll learn a lot about the binding process. A lot of small presses will do rebinding also.

Anonymous said...

I don't believe this is referring to taking your book to Kinko's and having a cover put on it.
There are big companies which work alongside publishers; not sure if the books are overstock but I'm pretty sure they're not 'used' books.
http://www.pma-online.org/scripts/shownews.cfm?id=1152

Janet McConnaughey said...

An advanced Google on
all of these: binding rebinding
phrase: library binding

gets us to (among other places)


a nifty bookbinding dictionary


the Library Binding Institute

and

the Booklab

The Green Cedar said...

My ex-husband worked and worked and worked to get a hand bindery up and running and never quite succeeded. It's a tough business. He did some gorgeous rebinding (including of my Bible, Bonnie -- in elk hide, no less) and restoration. He was motivated by love of the books themselves. Far cry from textbooks and paperbacks in the library, but a craft worth doing, I think.