1.31.2006

Hola, que pasa?

Dear Miss Snark,


In my reserach on agents, I've come across several who mention "Latina Fiction". I've never heard of the genre or type before. I assume that it might be romance with hispanic protagonists, but none of my seraches have come up with anything beyond university classes on Latino Literature of the Twentieth Century. What exactly is Latina fiction?


How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accent by Julia Alvarez

It's exactly what you think it is. 1/3 of all Americans --err...as is so ably pointed out in the comment trail, Miss Snark's nitwittery is on full display here--. 1/3 of all people who live in the US (not "Americans") will speak Spanish as their FIRST language by the year 2020. Publishers can read demographic studies almost as well as pop music producers.

11 comments:

Bill Peschel said...

Carumba! is also good.

The Beautiful Schoolmarm said...

Gracias Senorita Snark. Beso tus zapatos.

I don't know what snark translates to in Spanish, though.

Cheryll said...

Ermmmm -- more than 60% of all Americans already do speak Spanish as their first language. And 1/3 of Norte Americanos already do, since that includes Mexico, US & Canada...

Picky of me, but the point is that there is a HUGE market for Spanish language print materials, music, movies and TV scripts, mostly south of us.

Not so much in the US, however. Even though more than half of Californians speak some form of Spanish, few of them actually read it. They read in English, but they want the novelas, the corezon de mujeres, which is what Latina Fiction is about.

Anonymous said...

I think it is translated into "snarka," as in Senorita Snarka.

--Lizzy

Jen said...

This is rather interesting to me. I have a friend in town who writes hispanic stories. I don't know if she is subbing any of them, though.

Anonymous said...

It's not just about Spanish-language fiction. It's also stories written in English from the perspective of people like me who have grown up as Americans with a Latin heritage. We speak Spanish, sure, but we live our lives in English. And also, it's not just romance fiction; it's everything -- chick lit, thrillers, what have you. The novel referenced by Miss Snark by Julia Alvarez is literary fiction. This is a market that is just starting to emerge, but a growing one.

Anonymous said...

Cheryll said: more than 60% of all Americans already do speak Spanish as their first language.

What's your source for that figure? The US Dept of Health estimates that 37 million Americans do not speak English at home. That number is not even close to 60% of 298 million (current US population, excluding illegals). And it also includes first languages other than Spanish.

Miss Snark said...

Anon, you're missing the point. Americans are people who live "in the Americas" ie all North and South, not just the USofA. I made the mistake of equating the two in my post, but corrected it. People who live in Mexico live in America...and speak Spanish.

wannabe said...

But Miss Snark - if someone asked your nationality, you would reply "American." Just as those in Canada would reply "Canadian" and NOT "American"

Anonymous said...

The term American refers first and foremost to a US citizen, unless indicated otherwise. Mexicans, Canadians, Brazilians, etc., may live in the Americas, but they don't call themselves Americans and neither does anyone else.

Sal said...

I spent some of my formative youth in Brazil. My dad used to astound folks here in the States when he'd tell them that Portuguese is the most widely spoken language in South America.

All but one of the South American countries have Spanish as their majority language, but Brazilians speak Portuguese and boy howdy are there a lot of Brazilians.

Next time you're playing Trivial Pursuit ...