1.30.2006

So, you think email queries are great, huh?

My email program allows me to sort email addresses into categories. Each category has a color, so editors, clients, publishers, marketing and pr folks all have their own color. When their email pops into my mailbox, their name and subject are in color so I know to read it. Anyone emailing for the first time has no designation and so their address is in black.

Helps weed out email from Nigeria and Rabbitania, and those wanting to help me enlarge my ...um...vocabulary.

IF you've queried Miss Snark and we've had some correspondence, you also have a category. It's called "potential clients". It's a nice lovely green.

This morning I had an email. I didn't remember the email address, but because it was green, I knew to open it.

Alas. A chain letter. A chain letter about the year of the dog.

Clearly this person had added Miss Snark's email address to her address book, and then just sent this email to "all".

First of all, don't ever do that anyway.
Second, please, don't EVER send that shit to an agent. If I'd been thinking of taking this woman on as a client, I'd be having more than second thoughts now. This is the behavior of the rank amateur.

Keep a separate email address for your e=queries, and put agent addresses in those. Don't send us anything personal, even if you think it's good for our souls, pocketbooks, or our business. NO EXCEPTIONS.

16 comments:

Jarsto said...

I assume the exception to NO EXCEPTIONS is mister Clooney's personal contact info (sent only to Miss Snark and not an entire list). As for chainletters and their ilk I don't even like getting them from people I who have my e-mail address for strictly personal correspondence.

Sha'el, Princess of Pixies said...

Dear Mr. Snark:
Do we have a deal for you! Vacation in Nigeria and recieve one souviner political captive, one enlarged thingie, a bazillion dollars in the bank of your choice (send us your bank account info and passwords please)and a very cute Russian made Kachina Doll for good luck. You must forward this email to 40 friends by the end of Tuesday or bad luck will follow you always.

You mean you don't want that kinda email, huh?

the GREEN ray said...

I knew there was a good reason for choosing the name, Green Ray. Now I know, a potential client of Miss Snark! Wow! I always uncheck the agents in my address book if I'm sending out a group email. How GREEN this person was!

Kelly said...

Reminds me of the time I received one of those "get to know you" questionnaire chain e-mails ... from a former boyfriend who, a YEAR earlier, had cravenly dumped me by e-mail. If I hadn't known it before, I certainly knew then that this idiot was way too dumb for me.

M@ said...

It's not just stupid to send that stuff to an agent -- it's stupid to send it to any business associate.

The easiest way to avoid it is to never, ever pass that stuff along. The Internet and everyone's inboxes are full enough of garbage without people passing it along. Please, everyone, try to control yourselves.

Angela said...

Don't give up on her yet.

It's possible that the person has a virus of some kind and the virus claimed her mailbox and sent out a bunch of emails from her address. I'd give her another chance. This has happened to me once (which is why I don't use Outlook) and I've been the recipient numerous times.

Elektra said...

Does that mean that the virus would make Miss Snark's E-mail send the thing to all the editors/other agents/clients in her address book?

Anonymous said...

Angela has it right, Miss Snark.

The spoofing of e-mail addresses by mass-mailing worms is very common. In fact, you should be aware that your very own e-mail address may have showed up in innumerable editors' inboxes with a virus/chain letter/other hoax attached. This e-mail would look exactly like it came from you, only... it didn't. It could have come from the infected computer of anyone who has your e-mail address in his/her address book.

So please don't blame the hapless person whose name is attached to that chain e-mail. Her worst offense may be to have had her computer hit with a virus.

Bernita said...

Viruses corrupting our attempts at simple communication.
Yet more tares and nettles in our paths.
Gloom.

Anonymous said...

Elektra: not necessarily.

Most of these viruses/worms still are delivered via e-mail attachments that must be opened in order for their payloads to activate. This is why it's important not to open attachments from unknown parties -- or even unexpected attachments from known parties. It's perfectly all right to shoot a quick e-mail back to someone, asking if they sent you an attachment.

And keep your virus definitions up-to-date. That way, even if you do inadvertently click open a malicious attachment, the evil code will be captured by your antivirus software before it can wreak any havoc.

Bonnie Calhoun said...

I thoroughly hate chain letters, meme's and tagging...God bless the soul that sends me one...evisceration comes to mind!

Stephen said...

Viruses don't even need to come into it. Spammers don't want their own e-mail inboxes filling up with bounces from their carefully targeted messages about enlarging your wurlitzer (mine already rises out of the floor - what more do they think I want?), so they use other peoples e-mail addresses as the "from" address. Not very nice behaviour, if you ask me. Poor show.

Ooh, word verification is "ntwiz" - presumably a fast-moving ntwit.

Anonymous said...

Oh Miss Snark, chain letters are so valuable. I got one just that other day that promised I would lose five pounds if I forwarded it :)

jessicacrockett said...

Hold up, Miss Snark - don't crucify this poor sod yet. Are you sure they weren't sending it for Killer Yapp's enjoyment?

reprehn said...

That's pretty funny...I hate getting those things! I can't imagine sending something to everyone on my list -- esecially as my husband's list and mine are one and the same, and his is mostly business. Who started that practice, anyway? A pox on them....

Gina Black said...

What color are the Snarklings?