2.09.2006

Miss Snark Considers the Atlas and shrugs

I was wondering how much an author's location influences your decisions? Does your heart sink when you see the stamps with kangaroos/bagpipes/other symbols that make it clear that this is not what you might call a local submission?

Let's say, for example, you get a nice query letter and five great pages from a writer in New Zealand. You would definitely be interested if it was from a writer in Boston. Would the writer's location matter to you? I'm assuming that if it's an outstanding submission you would progress it, but what if it's pretty good - but not outstanding?


The only location that is an automatic pass is a stamp that says Rabbitania (for those of you wondering what the HELL this reference to rabbitania is, you'll have to look in the Snarkives right after the Crapometer finished)

I don't even look at the envelopes when I open them. I'm reading your email as I slice and dice. Then I unfold the pages. If they are weird size I know I'm dealing with a furriner. We do not discriminate based on furr-iness here. KY does not allow that.

Currently I have a client who lives in Canada, and one who lives in China. I considered work from a woman who lived in Germany but the novel didn't work. I was able to hook her up with some other people for other kinds of writing, so that was fun.

The only thing I care about is how you write. It's not good enough to be good enough. You really have to be VERY good to get my attention even if you think haggis is a food, or grandma arrived on a prison ship, or pop was a pirate that retired on a south sea island or you live in that truly odd and unsual place...Boston.

Write well. That's it. And buy frigging US stamps for the damn return postage. The only thing I do with IRCs is set them on fire and chant your name followed by fierce invectives.

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

So you'd also be fine with a submission postmarked "Galt's Gulch" then?

-JG

Anonymous said...

It's certainly heartening to know that you are open to considering submissions from the old countries, but doesn't it all get awfully complicated further down the line, with currency and tax and all of that stuff? Presumably we're better advised to try agents in our home country first rather than exporting containers full of queries in the hope of snagging Miss Snark?
-ril

mcbun said...

The muddy pawmark of a Rabbitanian stamp is considered by many to be quite a collectible.

Stephen said...

doesn't it all get awfully complicated further down the line, with currency and tax and all of that stuff?

As a furriner, I wouldn't expect a US agent (if I were dealing directly with one) to concern herself with my tax situation. I'd expect US royalties to be paid in US dollars, and ensure that I had a dollar-denominated bank account to receive them in, and an accountant who could work out how much tax I should be paying to whom.

In fact I have a British agent (sounds a bit James Bond-ish...) and any American income (mmm, that would be nice) will go via them and be sorted out under whatever subagency agreement they'll have sorted out. I'll still need the accountant to worry about tax, however.

Lisa Hunter said...

Citizenship is a more pertinent issue than location. I'm an American living in Canada. My U.S. agent reports my income to the IRS and mails me my check, just as if I lived in Ohio. It's no problem at all.

Roving Brit said...

The US taxes worldwide income, but for some other nationalities, location is more important. I'm a roving Brit and generally my income has been taxed in the country where I have earnt it. That's oversimplifying it, but the complicated bit is why tax lawyers make a fat living.

Anonymous said...

"And buy frigging US stamps for the damn (sic) return postage"???

Thanks, MS. This shows that you TRULY live on an island. May it drift out to sea.

RRB (from a neighboring island, but with a somewhat more "cosmopolitan" view of the world)

Anonymous said...

The only thing I do with IRCs is set them on fire and chant your name followed by fierce invectives.

Can someone please tell me what an IRC is?

Stijn Hommes said...

"Presumably we're better advised to try agents in our home country first rather than exporting containers full of queries in the hope of snagging Miss Snark?"

Not many editors in non-English speaking countries are happy accepting English submissions. So Chinese, German and Dutch people who write in English all have very good reasons to export their work, though for Europeans, I would recommend trying British publishers and agents first.

Anonymous said...

hehehe
Lovin' the Rand reference!
=)