4.30.2006

Rejection transmission timing

Dear Miss Snark,
In an attempt not to appear needy and annoy my agent, I thought I would ask you. Whereby I'm probably annoying you. But I was wondering how long you take to pass on any rejections by publishers to your clients. Is it easier just to email any rejections straight away, or do you hold on to them in an attempt not to provoke a spate of needy/woe is me emails from the writer. I can actually imagine being tempted to do this if I were an agent, especially if I were extra busy, or quite frankly not in the mood for gloom and angst.

I'm imagining a huge pile of rejections accumulating on my agent's desk and she is being nice/ too busy/ or not in the mood for having to coddle a distraught sooky writer (take your pick) to send on the bad news to me.

Thanks for your wonderful blog which has taught me not to bother my agent. I've let four weeks go without making up an excuse to email her.

Regards to Killer Yapp!



Killer Yapp says "regard, shmgards, where are the cookies" but he's just grumpy cause he had to put away his winter boots today and his toes are sore from the pavement.

Now, back to the even sorer spot of rejections.

Some of my clients want to see every rejection. I think this is madness but it's their call. I send them the moment they come in cause I don't like things sitting around waiting for me to forget to do them.

Some of my clients want to see only rejections that have substantive comments. I send them the moment they come in in cause I don't like things sitting around waiting for me to forget to do them.

Some of my clients don't want to see anything other than "let's make a deal", so I note the rejection and file it when it comes in cause I don't like things sitting around waiting for me to forget to do it.

Are you sensing a pattern here?

Miss Snark however is not the template for all agents, despite the fact that would make the world so much spiffier (ow! ow! wait, turn OFF those heated glares, my ears are on fire!) and some agents may set them aside.

The trick here is to ask YOUR agent whata she does. And tell her what you want. Contrary to popular belief, we do like keeping our clients happy. It reduces wear and tear on the 'do if we don't have to pull our our hair all the time in frustration.

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