5.18.2006

Order! Order! Order in the sentencing!

Dear Miss Snark,

fi yuo cna raed tihs, yuo hvae a sgtrane mnid, too.
Cna yuo raed tihs? Olny 55 plepoe tuo fo 100 anc.

i cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdanieg. The phaonmneal pweor of the hmuan mnid, aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it dseno't mtaetr in waht oerdr the ltteres in a wrod are, the olny iproamtnt tihng is taht the frsit and lsat ltteer be in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can sitll raed it whotuit a pboerlm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. Azanmig huh? yaeh and I awlyas tghuhot slpeling was ipmorantt!


Msis Srnak tknhis tihs wlil mkae cpoy erdtios raceh for tiehr hnad gedrenas.

24 comments:

Anonymous said...

It's sad, I actually had to stop and make sure something was wrong. The brain is a cool thing.

Dwight The Troubled Teen said...

Sh*t...

0_0

>_<

0_0

Apparently, I am severely undercaffeinated this morning.

Anonymous said...

Easy to read, but perhaps I can go you one better. Having grown up in the newspaper business reading metal type, I can still read upside down and backwards as proficiently as I can regular printing. Not sure what good it does me, however.

Sue said...

Curiously, the email I received containing this "gem" suggested that 100% of the people could easily read it. Wonder what snopes* would say?

snopes.com is the urban legends "debunking" site I use most often

Christopher said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
archer said...

I remember those subway ads!

If u/c rd ths msj u/c bkm a sec & gt a gd jb.

I also remember a magic marker entry under one of them that said:

bl sht

Bernita said...

let me guess...the writer is a medical student?

Chiffonista said...

I've been seeing this around for several years now, so I felt the urge to comment. Snopes does have an article on it that puts it at circa 2003. The snopes page is at www.snopes.com/language/apocryph/cambridge.asp.

Interesting to note that snopes is undecided on the veracity.

Corn Dog said...

It's easier to read than the word verification. Mine was whtnvs this time. I think.

Harry Connolly said...

This has been going around the web for a while, but it's not true.

To my knowledge, there's no-one in Cambridge UK who is currently doing research on this topic.

BuffySquirrel said...

I wouldn't mind working that little bit harder to read it if it had anything interesting to say.

(I remember the adverts too, but the ones I saw were in magazines)

Brenda Bradshaw said...

This is the best thing someone had to do with their time today?

M. G. Tarquini said...

This made me laugh.

Pepper Smith said...

The comment at the bottom about spelling not being important annoys me. Without all the proper letter there, the brain couldn't unscramble the word to begin with.

December Quinn said...

Yeah, I can read it, but that doesn't mean spelling isn't important.

Would you buy a whole book written like that? Hell, no.

Michelle K said...

Language Hat (http://www.languagehat.com/archives/000840.php) had a post about this several years ago.

Make sure to check the discussion in the comments.

Gabriele C. said...

I can read it but with effort. I'm synaesthetic, and misspelled words have the wrong colour - if all the letters are there but misplaced, it's a very subtle shift in the general shade a word has for me, and that's annoying.

Roy said...

On the other hand, it's easy to follow the rule (first and last letters in place) and make text totally unintelligible. I think that example was probably bogus.

BuffySquirrel said...

Interesting. I followed the link Harry posted and looked at the example sentences there. I really got hung up on "magltheuansr" until I read the rest of the sentence; then it clicked into place. Context, context, context!

HawkOwl said...

What's funny is that I was also able to read the jumbled French, German, Spanish and Italian, even though I only speak two of them and only one well. The Russian, on the other hand, I couldn't make out at all. I think it's harder because all the Cyrillic characters are the same height. Roman letters are easier to make sense of quickly because their shapes are more varied.

Beth said...

Although i've seen this around all over, I still can't believe someone hasnt corrected the ONE mistake there is.


"aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy,"

since when does "researcher" end in an "h".

Has anyone else caught this?

Elizabeth said...

All right, so we can still read words even with the letters all jumbled up. A moderately cool thing to know about humanity...but, why bother?

Anonymous said...

I wnat to rcaeh for my hnad gdarene.

I hate that thing. When I read it, it feels like I'm talking with my face in the water. I had never typed like that until now, and that's even worse.

Dear God...

Anonymous said...

this person has it wrong, anyway. It's a bastardised version of the original, which was from Oxford University - the first and last letter do need to be the same, but the shape of the word also needs to be the same, and it only works in Courier.
When you see the real version, it's actually pretty amazing - it really does take you a few minutes to realise. I think this version isn't nearly as good.