6.04.2006

Snarko Panza a votre servis, Senor Quixote

I'm building my story line around a rather sedate subject (a disability). I try to convince myself that good writing and a compelling narrative flow will win out even though the subject may not be exciting on the face. We can both name great books that tackled disabilities (Heart is a Lonely Hunter, Never Promised You a Rose Garden, etc), but most appear to be in decades past. If I'm jousting at windmills here, please just Snark me and put me out of my misery.


Motherless Brooklyn


The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night

Fear Nothing

and the novels listed here



The only thing I'm going to Snark you for is NOT having read Motherless Brooklyn, but trust me, the penalty for that oversight will be fully realized only after you've read the book and have seen what you've missed. Jon Letham is a superb novelist and really, you should just read everything he writes right now.

5 comments:

Kendall said...

Rock on - Motherless Brooklyn isn't my usual genre to read, but I read it soon after it came out (because of the subject matter) and thought it was very good. (I already knew Lethem was very good, though, which helped entice me to pick it up.)

Anonymous said...

Of the 39 books you referred to, I had read only 2. I thought I was better than that. My order for "Motherless Brooklyn" is placed. A humble thank you.

Alison S said...

And doesn't "Curious Incident" prove that anything will overcome prejudice if written well enough? Because here's Miss Snark recommending it, and it features a dead dog, which she says is an automatic "no" in her book...

Eileen said...

Someone passed me Motherless Brooklyn- dang but that is a good book.

Anonymous said...

Just make sure you know what you are talking about. I just read a book featuring Autism, and it was clesr that the author didn;t know a thing about it.