7.09.2006

Writing Credential Mid-Stream

Miss Snark,

As you shop around a client's book, do you like to hear from that client when he/she has published a piece in a significant magazine or lit. journal, or received a respected award, even if it doesn't necessarily have anything to do with the book? Do you add that info to the client's credentials when contacting the next round of publishers?

Yes.
It also gives me a reason to call up anyone looking at his/her book and say "Im so thrilled to tell you that s/he has had a story accepted by the New Yorker ".

6 comments:

Quick said...

I always wondered about this when I was sending novel manuscripts around. I always thought it was unnecessary information as it was the novel that was being assessed. I still mentioned the published stories, was just never sure if I had done the right thing. I feel better now.

Anonymous said...

Speaking of the New Yorker--fantasizing may be a better word--I'm wondering if they actually give serious consideration to unagented submissions. If little old, unknown me sends a piece to the appropriate e-mail inbox, is that an automatic reject?

Anyone?

Anonymous said...

I actually asked the New Yorker fiction editor, Deborah Treisman, that very question. No, nearly all of their published fiction is agent submitted. It is the rare exception, meaning a handful of times, that a piece has been pulled from the slush pile. She did say that if a slush story showed promise, an editor would contact the writer with a critique.

My advice is to try smaller, respectable lit mags and work your way up.

Anonymous said...

Re: No, nearly all of their published fiction is agent submitted. It is the rare exception, meaning a handful of times, that a piece has been pulled from the slush pile.

It never used to be that way. Sadly, times have changed there.

Thanks said...

Thank you, Anonymous 2 & 3 for your responses. Confirms what I've been told.

Anonymous #1

Sal said...

It never used to be that way. Sadly, times have changed there.

It was "that way" there under Bill Buford, who said, "I can't recall the last writer who leapt from the crates to the page."

Unlike Buford, Deborah Treisman has clearly stated that the magazine does read its slush. Whether that will take you anywhere ...

"DT: We do read all submissions. I don't personally, but we have interns and assistants. I would love nothing more than to have something come in over the transom and be fantastic. In the five years I've been here, we've published a handful of people who didn't have agents. What most often happens, though, is that someone seems talented and they develop a relationship with an editor, and then a year or two later, something gets published, but it's not coming in through the slush pile then because they've established a correspondence.

Two magazines that do! pick work out of their slush piles are

The Paris Review Snail-sub only.

A Public Space, a new quarterly magazine with fiction, poetry and essays started by Brigid Hughes, former executive editor at TPR, a year or two ago. E-sub.