10.04.2006

Calling all space cadets


LOST magazine
December's issue will orbit the theme "Lost in Space." They're looking for fiction, nonfiction, and poetry by November 1. Submissions guidelines here


(They're still reading fiction and nonfiction for the November issue,
and will be until Oct. 9.)

20 comments:

Dave said...

I guess we should submit a story to them, huh? After all, that's what writers do, isn't it?

Anonymous said...

Well, according to their website the don't actually pay their contributors anything but publicity, so I'd recommend trying actual paying markets first.

Bunneh said...

Anon -- nothing wrong with publicity. Getting paid is nice, of course, but getting noticed is no less valuable.

Is there a specific theme for the November issue as well? I went poking around the site, but couldn't find whether that was the case.

Sha'el, Princess of Pixies said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
dink said...

Are you sure about the poetry?

Is this special Miss Snark insider info? Or something special for the Dec. issue?

I can't find any mention of poetry on the Lost site.

got my fingers crossed I'm not being a nitwit (but willing to risk it)

snarkfodder said...

At first I was thinking along the same lines as anonymous, is it worth it if they don't pay cash? I almost asked Miss Snark. Then I realized, well, would she have posted if she didn't think it was worth it?

In Snark We Trust.

Kimber An said...

"Cadet Gennie Delano, reporting for duty as ordered, Captains."

desert snarkling said...

What makes you think you have a chance at a paying market? Pay your dues dude or dudette.

Errr. Ummm.

If you're good enough to send your stuff out at all, you're good enough to sell to paying markets.

I happen to like what these folks are doing. Enough so that I might submit to them, even though they don't pay.

But to say you shouldn't try paying markets until you pay your dues with non-paying ones -- no, no, and no.

Always start at the top, no matter how new you are. Or else keep your ms home and keep revising it until you're ready to start at the top.

Many writers have built careers without ever giving their work away.

Sha'el, Princess of Pixies said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
also said...

I do not submit work to publications that do not pay. Getting noticed can happen in paying markets. It's a subject that is discussed on several writer's forums lately. The pros are advising other writers to ignore the non-paying markets because if a publisher can produce a 'quality' magazine, they can pay their contributors. Just thought I'd mention it.

Dave said...

Their blog contains more information about submissions and topics.
http://lostmag.com/blog/

You might have to look back at their archives for November.

Erastes said...

I have to say I'd never heard of Lost. I thought it was a fanfiction site for that dreadful show.

Publicity is nice but "cheque enclosed" are the two nicest words in the english language. I will submit to "token" payment publishers, but I won't to non-payers, no matter how prestigious.

And yes, before you jump on me, Ms Princess, I'm published many times over.

I agree with Desert - start at the top, always. If you don't think that you are top dollar, how do you expect anyone else to think the same of you?

Mary Robinette said...

I'll have to chime in with those that are surprised that Miss Snark would recommend a non-paying market.

Anonymous said...

Don't understand this "they don't pay" furor. LOST clearly states that the contributor maintains rights and is free to send it to other publications.

jlb said...

Thanks for the tip Miss Snark :)

Anonymous said...

Sha'el, what makes me think I have a shot at paying markets? The fact that I have sold to paying markets. That's all. I totally agree with desert snarkling: start at the top.

Mary Robinette Kowal said...

Anonymous said...

Don't understand this "they don't pay" furor. LOST clearly states that the contributor maintains rights and is free to send it to other publications.

--

Ah, but you've given up your First Serial Rights, and there aren't that many publications that will take a reprint. Basically, what you've got now is a good story that's been used. Imagine trying to sell a used car at new car prices. The moment a story has been published, it loses its value to most other publishers. The publishers of magazines and journals maintain their audiences by presenting material that the audiences can't get anywhere else, i.e. unpublished stories.

Now, there are cases where a non-paying market is worthwhile. Take the Elemental anthology. That would have been worthwhile because the proceeds went to charity and the authors in the magazine were very high profile, so if you got in, your own stature would rise. But that's an anthology and a rare exception.

I'll take a token payment, but exposure? Thank you, no. I have worked in the arts for fifteen years and have yet to see a venue that offered exposure as its only form of compensation, which has had any impact on my career. Getting paid for my work gets much more attention.

For me, the bottom line is that one should not be sending out stories unless one thinks they are good enough to appear in a paying magazine. Consider this, if it's not good enough to appear in a paying magazine but one gets it into a non-paying venue for the exposure, what is being exposed? Work that is not one's best.

That's not how one pays dues as a writer. Those get paid by working with critique groups, studying, taking workshops, going to conventions and most importantly, by writing.

jude calvert-toulmin said...

mary robinette kowal:

What a great post. It's inspired me to check out your site. Oh MAN! I am so impressed that you're a puppeteer! I just watched the YouTube of the giant marionette, "Giant Little Girl and Elephant" on your site and it has moved me to tears, I don't know why. Absolutely brilliant. That puppet is almost as good as Tin Tin. Only huge! And all the little children sitting on her arm. Just amazing :)

Harry Connolly said...

I've heard that "Lost" magazine is paying their printer in exposure, too.

For a longer, more snarky discussion of writing for publicity instead of pay, check out this entry in Nick Mamatas LiveJournal. Warning: he is not as gentle as Miss Snark.

He's also a terrific writer.

also said...

Mary Robinette Kowal said... "Ah, but you've given up your First Serial Rights, and there aren't that many publications that will take a reprint. Basically, what you've got now is a good story that's been used. Imagine trying to sell a used car at new car prices.

Mary is correct. I have sold a non-fiction article five times, and one of my short stories 5 times also, but only once at the professional rate. A reprint gets 'reprint' rates which is considerably less. If you work hard on your writing, and care about what readers think, aim for the top markets first and work your way down.