11.15.2006

Let me know if you can see this link

I'm not sure if you need a subscription to Publishers Marketplace to see this link.
If you can't see it, let me know and I'll pull snippets for a post later in the day.

Otherwise, just click and read.

20 comments:

Rich said...

Clear as the proverbial. Now to read it...

Anonymous said...

Sadly, the link works just fine. For a newbie author just a few weeks away from beginning the query process, the article provides yet another why-would-anyone-want-to-get-involved-in-this-industry reality check. Happily, I know the answer. Wish I knew Bill Andrews, too.

Chumplet said...

Very poignant. I read on another blog about the 'restructuring' of Random House and the many changes it went through in the last fifteen years.

Soon, all companies will be run by one parent monster with clones at each desk. Shades of The Matrix. Shudder.

overdog said...

They felt it was important enough to mention it in the "Lunch," too.


(best word verification ever: "opoem.")

Maya Reynolds said...

If someone cannot read the post via the link, you can go to Robert Gray's own website at:

www.fresheyesnow.com

and read it there.

Susan Helene Gottfried said...

... or you can read about it at Maya's blog, too.

murm said...

hey, that was beautiful.

thanks.

Ryan Field said...

Though no one will feel better, this is happening in all industries right now. I don't want to imagine how many VP's got canned before they went after sales.

Kim Stagliano said...

Huge sigh. I'm sorry that this quality person was dropped. I see this everywhere. A dear friend's husband lost his job after 19 years - just landed a new one at $20K LESS salary. Kids in college, High school and an autistic son. My own husband? More months than I have fingers and toes out of work before he landed a job in his industry, tens of thousands below his previous salary and a move to metro NY to boot. I fear given Wall Street's nano-second outlook that people will never been as assets again. Mere numbers on the bottom line. This disheartens me. Truly. And so we add another name to our prayer lists...

Brady Westwater said...

The only silver lining is that I suspect he is going to be flooded with offers - and not just from publishers.

BeachBumBill said...

Don't let the green eyeshade types at RH read this: Use the IBM sales model; get rid of the sales force and use "partners" and a 1-800 number instead.

Think of the savings!

BeachBumBill

Anonymous said...

Gordon Gecko may have made the case that Greed is Good, but it doesn't follow that More and More Greed is Better and Better. Wall Street's expectations have grown so optimistic, they're decimating the class of people that actually works for a living and pays taxes (rather than collecting dividends).

Northshire Bookstore is a fantastic place, BTW. If you're ever in Manchester, VT, definitely visit.

Ms. Graham said...

This is just sad. Not pathetic, but sorrowful. The impersonalization of the publishing corporation is not something that I've experienced first hand, and I pray that I never do.

Anonymous said...

Sad. Cold and unfeeling. Welcome to what this world is coming to. Fire the old experienced and hire the young yuppy that thinks only of himself. Good luck, Bill Andrews.
CJ Parker

lizzie26 said...

As Kim S. said, it's not just the publishing industry. Many people, good employees for many years, are given the boot. "Thanks, but see ya."

No such thing as job security.

And people wonder why those under 30 don't seem to care about their jobs as much? Probably saw their parents and grandparents going through hell.

Kim Stagliano said...

No - I feel for the young yup coming up - because she/he has NO IDEA that companies used to value their employees. They will never know that security and that is also very sad. My father in law spent 42 years as an executive with Seagrams (now there's a good gin!)and even into his retirement they took care of him, as promised. He earned it with his service to them. It wasn't a gift. There ARE companies that still value employees, like Costco and even Starbucks. But they are the exception, no longer the rule. Ask the poor guy who spent 35 years with United Airlines and saw his pension go bye bye. While the executive team gets six figure bonuses for trimming "expenses." The world is topsy turvy and it's every man for himself. I think we all just hang on for dear life. Sorry, enough gobbledygook from Kim. This is all just very near and dear to me.

Anonymous said...

I watched a friend, a superb salesman, get canned from Simon & Schuster with similar lack of foresight. Needless to say, he works for himself and is doing great--their loss. But he knew the trade, knew the sellers, knew the authors--it was a great loss to them and they don't even know it.

Maya Reynolds said...

Susan: Thanks for the plug. It was such a nice surprise.

Regards,

Maya

Anonymous said...

As an debut author about to be published by Random House that link made me want to cry. Losing someone clearly so dedicated to literature will only weaken a company whose goal, while being a business, is also to promote good literature. What a shame. And if such a good rep has such a precarious position in the company, makes me wonder about a debut author. And there they are assuring me that all will be fine when it comes time for the book to come out. Should I promote, I asked them, and they just laughed. "Some books sell and some books just don't," was the exact quote I got. "We just have to wait and see." Like Bil waited to see how his dedication to RH and their books would be rewarded? That kind of waiting and seeing?????? Yikes.

Maya Reynolds said...

Like everyone else, I was deeply moved by Robert Gray's post.

Interestingly enough, there was another post in Shelf Awareness on Tuesday. The New Atlantic Independent Booksellers Association (NAIBA) is changing the focus of their annual convention and trade show from soliciting orders to better selling the publishers' books.

The NAIBA prez said that booksellers need to become the frontline of the publishers' sales force.

It's a good strategy--and maybe the best one to combat the discounts being offered by Wal-Mart and Target.