12.30.2006

Crapometer Round 2

The pages.
We'll get to that next weekend.

If I've emailed you and asked for pages, you've got a couple days to get them in if you haven't. The ONLY people who should send pages are those who got an email asking for them. If you think you should have gotten an email, but didn't check your spam trap. Several people found Miss Snark missives trapped there.

Questions?
Email me or Killer Yapp.

14 comments:

Virginia Miss said...

This blog is my biggest distraction from writing.
Although I'm looking forward to reading all the first pages, I sure can use a week of distraction-free writing.
Happy New Year Miss Snark and Snarklings.

Marlowe Swanson said...

I also thank you for this wonderful distraction over the holidays. I had two deadlines, but managed to drag them both kicking and screaming right up to the last minute since I had so much fun here.
A gin toast to you tomorrow night.
Holly
whytheworldneedswriters.blogspot.com

Terry said...

I had a brilliant comment, which disappeared when I tried to submit it due to the change from blogger to google.

So -- Thanks! Looking forward to reading pages.

Is anyone tracking the genres? I seemed to notice a lot of YA and paranormal submissions. Or maybe they just jumped out at me because I read neither.

And we know that under the facade of snarkiness, there beats a kind and generous heart. (Note--I didn't say you were NICE!)

Happy New Year.

jamiehall said...

How many got to stage two? I hope for your sake that it isn't more than 50.

December Quinn said...

*starts biting nails in terrified anticipation*


Have a wonderful New Year, Miss Snark.

Brady Westwater said...

So when's the next Crapometer?

J.A. said...

This was fun and all, but I miss your regular snarkiness. Good to have you back for a while.

Virginia Miss said...

I think I counted over 50 that "hooked" Miss Snark, but that doesn't mean she asked for pages on all of 'em. She praised lots of paranormals, plus several fantasies and more than a few juveniles.

Considering that around half of all titles published are romances, I saw surprisingly few in the crapometer

Anonymous said...

I remember MS mentioning 48 requests for pages, but that was probably 100 hooks ago, so I'm sure it's at least a little over 50 by now!

Anonymous said...

RIP Brady LOL!

wunderground said...

Congratulations on making it through the whole pile. This has definitely been both interesting and educational for a lot of us. I'm definitely looking forward to pages!

Anonymous said...

Dear Miss Snark,
I'm sorry, but since you've announced Crapometer 2, I've had to ask _____ _____ to come to Vegas with me for New Year's Eve. I'm tired of being the Crapometer widower.

Believe me, she won't be nearly as fun. She looks nice all cleaned up, she photographs well, and she knows which fork to use. But she won't do that cute little thing that you do at the end, and that's what I'll really miss.

If you do a Crapometer 3, then I'll be forced to do another movie with Brad Pitt. Brad has been aching to do one ever since he became Angelina's houseboy. But really, I'd much rather just be with you.

Yours,
George

inherwritemind1 said...

Virginia Miss said...
"I think I counted over 50 that "hooked" Miss Snark, but that doesn't mean she asked for pages on all of 'em. She praised lots of paranormals, plus several fantasies and more than a few juveniles.

Considering that around half of all titles published are romances, I saw surprisingly few in the crapometer"

Good observations, Virginia Miss.

I think the XYZ Happy Hooker formula works well for those genres because they so often have those hair-on-fire beginnings. (If memory serves, MS doesn’t do either YA or fantasy.) What’s a huge challenge -- at least to me -- is to write a hook for literary fiction, which often begins quietly.

I’m looking at the back cover of “Middlesex”, the Pulitzer Prize winner by Jeffrey Eugenides. The hook is two sentences long. (The punctuation below is as written.)

“Middlesex tells the breathtaking story of Calliope Stephanides, and three generations of the Greek-American Stephanides family, who travel from a tiny village overlooking Mount Olympus in Asia Minor to Prohibition-era Detroit, witnessing its glory days as the Motor City, and the race riots of 1967, before they move out to the tree-lined streets of suburban Grosse Pointe, Michigan.” (58 words.)

“To understand why Calliope is not like other girls, she has to uncover a guilty family secret, and the astonishing genetic history that turns Callie into Cal, one of the most audacious and wondrous narrators in contemporary fiction.” (38 words.)

The review adds, “Lyrical and thrilling, Middlesex is an exhilarating reinvention of the American epic.”

So much for short, declarative sentences. But who can argue with a Pulitzer winner?

I’d love to hear some thoughts on this from her Snarkiness.

Anonymous said...

Well, inherwritemind1, a query hook isn't the same as a jacket blurb, yanno.

j.c.