12.10.2006

Health Insurance for Writers

Dear Miss Snark,

I'm doing a semester paper for a class on a career I'd like to pursue, and I have to answer a question about health benefits. How do writers receive health benefits from their employers? is what I need to know.

Writers don't have employers. they receive royalties on a 1099-M Misc. income form.
If they have health insurance at all, they have it through something like Authors Guild, a spouse, or some other way.

6 comments:

Katie said...

Yeah, and they pay something which is like hundreds of thousands of dollars for it.

Ah! The unencumbered life.

John said...

(Writing from the bliss of a country with a national health service, but:)

Presumably, most writers get their health insurance from their day jobs? Or, if they're lucky, they buy it using their income.

pax et bonum

Anonymous said...

Or else they live in a sensible country where health cover is considered an essential and is paid for by the tax system. Oh and if they DO have a day job, they get four to six weeks holiday a year.

Mwah hah hah hah!

x.j. said...

I'm freelance and have solo insurance through Blue Cross/Community Blue. My plan is in the $120/month range. Its not fabulous, but, if I go into the hospital at least I won't be destroyed by the bills.

mahukey said...

WHHAAAT!!!This really happens? The government pays for...health care....where do I sign up. I can sing the Canadian anthem! Hey, that just ain't fair!

Maya Reynolds said...

Of all the challenges I have faced as a writer, the issue of medical insurance has been the most difficult.

Because I am a diabetic (well controlled), it was almost impossible to get individual health insurance. My monthly bill eventually reached $550 with a huge deductible and crummy benefits. I was essentially protecting myself from a health catastrophe, nothing else.

Seeing the direction I was headed--with a long time before I would qualify for Medicare--I decided I had to find a job. It took nearly a year to find something that fit my parameters: a position that paid well, but was not so demanding that I could not work at night and on weekends and that had excellent benefits.

I am now working as an administrator for a division of my state's university system. I'm making half of what I once made, but I also have half the pressure I once had. I made it clear at the outset that I could not work nights or weekends. Fortunately, my writing skills are prized by the faculty, and things are going well. The benefits are freaking unbelievable. I pinch myself every day at my good fortune.

I have been a lifelong Republican, but in the recent election I voted Democrat and will continue to do so until the U.S. creates a system of universal healthcare.