12.23.2006

HH Com 376

In the past year, Jazz Stephenson's lost her eye, her job, and her Canadian status. She's had to move home to Nassau, Bahamas, to live with her father and to resume her old position at a local paper, working for a woman she hates. The only thing that keeps her sane is the renovation of her grandmother's house in the historic part of town. But when Haitian labourers begin to die on her work site, Jazz faces bankruptcy, arrest, and death — and not necessarily in that order. Can her new affiliation with Trim Romer, a member of the construction crew, help or hurt? Were the labourers killed because they knew too much about the smuggling of humans through Bahamian waters? What’s the significance of the vodou symbols that appear in the belongings of the dead men? And can Jazz find the answers before she loses everything?


I'd be much more interested if I knew more about "smuggling of humans". Is everyone in Bahamian waters non-human? or do you perhaps mean getting people into a country without all the boring paperwork?

And any man named Trim...well, sorry, but I'm laughing my head off at that one.

Your best line is: Jazz faces bankruptcy, arrest, and death — and not necessarily in that order.
It reflects a sense of humor I always look for in books.

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Thanks for taking the time.

Points duly noted.

Virginia Miss said...

This looks promising. Good luck.

Anonymous said...

Love the setting, the problems, then splat on the hero's name.

My instant mental pic was of a taller, thinner, toothier, and way gayer Richard Simmons with tons more sequins on his clothes.

Anonymous said...

Love the setting, the problems, then splat on the hero's name.

My instant mental pic was of a taller, thinner, toothier, bouncier, and way gayer Richard Simmons with tons more sequins on his clothes.

Anonymous said...

Love to learn more about her grandmother's house, as well as the people. Where are they being taken?

dana p said...

I like it. The setting, the mention of vodou, Jazz's injury... this is off the beaten trail.

If I saw it in a store I'd definitely give it a closer look.

Anonymous said...

I'd pick this up in a bookstore. Sounds good to me.

snarkfodder said...

I'm curious to know the author's reasons for writing this kind of story in this kind of setting. Is the author Bahamian? Knowledgeable of Caribbean religious practices?

This is the kind of book that can be brim full of inaccuracies if any non-tourist comes across it. Makes me think of Peter Benchley's "The Deep."

I was born and raised in the Bahamas, and the issues raised don't fit with my impressions of Nassau. You may want to find a more obscure island on which to combine Haitian smuggling and vodoun.

And your second question doesn't make sense, logically. If the smugglers were worried that their human cargo "knew too much," they would have killed them on the boat and dumped their bodies overboard. Now if the Haitians plan to DO something with that knowledge, that's a different story. (And possibly a different reality; smuggled people generally stay very quiet. Why alert the authorities that you're in the country illegally? That's a quick deportation right there.)

Also, "the historic part of town" sounds fishy to me. Any given island will have several "historic parts." You need to name one for the sake of credibility.

Trim, however, isn't as ludicrous a name as some may think. Most likely it is a nickname. I once knew a man named Tinker; another named Peaches. It's common on the islands.