12.23.2006

HH Com 399

Suffocating in an oversized trash bag, Prue awakes, hysterical and confused, among piles of junk. A discovered typewriter offers her company as she escapes this dump and sets out on an unknown journey to uncover why she ended up in trash yard and more importantly, why her mind remains more or less a blank.

Although young and out seeking truths, Prue's story is no bildungsroman. As she and her typewriter move through the distant and disjointed world that has spurned them, she becomes more and more disaffected, finding solace only at the shoreline of the ocean also forgotten by this world and with her clunky, broken typewriter, who although only a machine, offers her more companionship than anyone else. She thus decides to focus on the easier task of fixing her trusty, little typewriter, without realizing that this simple decision will have such serious repercussions, unwittingly guiding her to self-discovery and yielding an answer, perhaps one that's haunted her all along, but not the one she wants. What's Prue, this lone girl who clings to a clunky machine like her lifeblood, to do? Follow her and her travails across a desiccated landscape in A GIRL, A TYPEWRITER, A DYSTOPIA, a novel of 51,000 words, to find out.

or you could just watch this

16 comments:

M. G. Tarquini said...

What are the chances of running into the word bildungsroman twice in one crapometer?

Anonymous said...

I had more fun watching that Jerry Lewis video than I've had at any time during this excercise.

Author, I don't know hat you were trying to evoke, but I got the sad feeling of watching someone mentally ill trying to tie their shoelaces. I don't know if that's going to sell. That may not be what your book is about. If it's not, then the hook needs to be re-worked.

Brady Westwater said...

What's a typewriter?

ORION said...

Oh my! I was taken back to my youth watching Jerry Lewis movies at the theater.
Only fifty cents would get you TWO movies!
Thanks Miss Snark...
wait...
That just reminded me how old I am!
I'm not so sure I'm grateful.

heidi said...

A typewriter? Why a typewriter?

At least we know why Wilson the Volleyball became a "companion"; he had a face, and that gave him some semblance of humanity.

Does Prue have conversations with the typewriter? What is her attachment to the typewriter?

Also,you've not mentioned a single other human--or any form of (semi)sentient being whatsoever--in this. Is she the only character that moves through this landscape? Does she come across others at all?

You've not given us little skeleton to imagine what the plot could be. We haven't the foggiest of what to guess might happen because you haven't given us enough to start with.

Also, descriptions of characters on a journey of self-discovery aren't that interesting unless there's some sort of twist.

Brady Westwater said...

In hindsight, there are some things the French weren't wrong about.

Anonymous said...

The only thing that could save this is truly gorgeous writing. If you can write gorgeously, show us in the query.

Anonymous said...

:Tired editor stares:

I get it already, a chick has amnesia and an intense attachment to a busted typewriter. Very symbolic, but what do I tell them at the acquistions meeting when they ask "Yeah, so--what happens? She have a job or what?"

Bonnie Shimko said...

The Jerry Lewis bit is funnier than ever. I loved it!

jerico said...

An amnesiac chick walking around with a typewriter is about as preposterous as, say, a plane crash castaway adopting a volleyball.

Anonymous said...

Try this as a short story.

Inkwolf said...

Actually, we use a typewriter at the libraruy where I work, and children DO constantly ask what it is...

I understand that repairing typewriters is a complicated task that people once went to tech school to learn...

Chumplet said...

It's like A Boy And His Dog, except with a typewriter.

Jerry Lewis in his heyday is better than Jim Carrey. It's hard for me to say that because ol' Jimmy Boy was born in my home town. He NEVER visits.

Anonymous said...

As a reader of speculative fiction, if I read this blurb on a book I would be tempted to buy it to find out what happens next. As an idea it beats all those done-to-death discovery of a magic whatever fantasy quest novels that have been appearing in this crapometer.

#399 said...

i appreciate all the commentary; thank you.

Anonymous said...

"As she and her typewriter move through the distant and disjointed world that has spurned them, she becomes more and more disaffected, finding solace only at the shoreline of the ocean also forgotten by this world and with her clunky, broken typewriter, who although only a machine, offers her more companionship than anyone else."

Speaking of clunky and broken...

This sounds YA, but you use words like dystopia and bildungsroman, so I assume it's not.