12.26.2006

HH Com 423

Ellen Zallinger Warner is sensible, cautious and introspective and has never wanted to be a has-been, over-the-hill, middle-aged divorcee. She has always wanted to be a respected, grieving widow....until her husband dies and leaves her a cabinet full of expensive photography equipment, a poorly conceived film production company, a contract to produce background film for a Burbank television studio and no life insurance. Since she is desperate and alone and has nothing more to lose, she decides to fulfill her husband's contract to film the wild, wide-open spaces of New Mexico.

Ellen learns about photography and drugs and cock-fighting in New Mexico. She also learns that she can recover her identity.


Is there an antagonist anywhere in the picture?
Conflict?
no? Cut!

4 comments:

Michele said...

I loved the opening, but want to see some really big conflict in New Mexico. I'm also hoping the book is funny, because the opening set-up seems to be.

aries said...

I think the antagonist might be Ellen's struggle to overcome her grief and establish her own identity while pursuing a new life. Emphasis on think because the first sentence is very confusing and doesn't fit with the rest of the hook. Why is Ellen thinking in terms of being a widower or divorcee at all? If she had a troubled marriage, that should be mentioned in the hook as it would provide a better context for her actions after his death.

Anonymous said...

How does photog equipment turn her from a widow into a divorcee? I'm confused.

stick and move said...

The first paragraph confused me also, this sentence in particular:

She has always wanted to be a respected, grieving widow...until her husband dies and leaves her a cabinet full of expensive photography equipment, a poorly conceived film production company, a contract to produce background film for a Burbank television studio and no life insurance.

It sounds as though all her life she's aspired to be a respected, grieving widow and her husband went and ruined her plans by dying without all his affairs in order.

Maybe it's just me, but that was confusing.