12.09.2006

That Laura Lippmann....

The Charmer in Charm City updated her website advice to authors on how to get published. I'm very honored she mentions this blog.

It's good advice, even if she hadn't.

Read it here
.

And if you need a holiday gift for a difficult relative who won't quit talking give them this. Guaranteed to shut anyone up for at least five hours.

13 comments:

Tattieheid said...

So much sage advice, across the internet yet there are still those hoping to short-circuit the process in some way.

Mind you life would be very boring if everybody actually followed the advice they are given. We wouldn't have all these gems of Snark wisdom to brighten up our week.:)

BernardL said...

Thank you for the link, Miss Snark. I have yet another avenue for self-publishing once I get my rejection notice quota. :)

Toddie said...

This was a lovely essay to read -- just the reassuring perk I needed after getting the fifteenth or twentieth "Sorry, not for me" pass. Laura Lippman is a terrific writer, and from what I read on her blog, a pretty damn nice person to boot.

Nicole Brackett said...

Great essay. I only wished she hadn't stopped after "Get an agent." What about the stage where you've gotten the awesome agent and are playing the waiting game that revolves around submission to editors? I'd love to see another installment.

JPD said...

This is also an example of great hook writing.. "3 former best friends are shot in a bathroom, one is now dead, one is critically injured, one is clearly lying."

I count 21 words that imply an entire novel...

JPD (reworking his own hook for the hundredth time...)

Anonymous said...

Musicians wear their independent status like badges of honor. Independent filmakers are hailed for their risk-taking and trailblazing, but any writer who does it herself is just an impatient hack who doesn't know better? Get over it. There always needs to be a way for people of all media to do it themselves, and for as cheaply as possible. The 1000 cases of money-wasting self-indulgence don't negate the few instances where self-publishing yielded something truly worthy. Don't believe it? Look at traditional publishing. Not exactly a bastion of literary excellence, eh?

Anonymous said...

"Three former best friends are discovered shot in a locked girls' restroom at a suburban Baltimore high school--one is dead, one is critically injured from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound, and the third is clearly lying."

Now THAT'S a hook! Sheesh, why can't I come up with something like that...?

Simon Haynes said...

"What about the stage where you've gotten the awesome agent and are playing the waiting game that revolves around submission to editors?"

Join the club ;-)

LadyBronco said...

Wow.

Just....wow.

KingM said...

Now THAT'S a hook! Sheesh, why can't I come up with something like that...?

Ideas are free. You could make your own novel from that same hook and it would have nothing to do with anyone else's version of same.

As an exercise, you might browse the thriller section of the bookstore and "reverse engineer" some plots based on catchy blurbs.

wheelmaker said...

I just bought To the Power of Three at Coliseum based on the recommendation here and that hook. What a beginning!

Laura said...

I like the suggestion about what to do next after one gets an awesome agent, and I'll probably take it on some time in 2007. The first thing my awesome agent did was put me through a rewrite. I'll also tackle what to do after you get your first publishing deal.

Here's some secondhand advice that saved my sanity: I showed my first novel to a friend who knew quite a bit about publishing. She told me to start my second one promptly. Now, granted, I write a series, but I think it's good advice to start your next book after a brief vacation. Because once you've started that next book, the fate of the book you've just finished has a little less power over you. By the time reviews start appearing for the about-to-be-published book, I'm deep into the next one. So when I get bad reviews -- and I've gotten some very bad ones -- I can focus on the book at hand.

Anonymous said...

kingm:
Hmm. That's not a bad idea. I'm afraid reverse engineering won't help as much for the book I've already written, though.

Anon #2