3.27.2007

double engendres

Dear Miss Snark,

I can’t get this whole “genre” thing straight in my mind. I know “genri” is a general truth or law, “genial” is warm and cheerful, “gentle” is soft and subdued, “genual” is the knee, a “genie” lives in a bottle, a “Gentile” is anybody not Jewish, a “gendarme” is a French cop, and a “general” is an officer in the army.

I’m sure you’ll agree that’s all very straightforward stuff. But here’s where my brain gets twisted in a knot. I just finished reading a book about a non-Jewish French cop dating a warm and cheery Jewish senior army officer, with the understanding that religious law precluded their marrying, and when they walked on the beach one day they knelt to pick up a bottle, and a soft and subdued supernatural creature popped out.

Does this book fall into the Gentile gendarme genial general genri genual gentle genie genre?

sui generis

7 comments:

Heatherlynne said...

I'm starting to think some people have too much time on their hands...

Kimber An said...

Ow. That just hurt my head. And before my second cup of coffee. Please, KY, but this Snarkling. Show no mercy.

Anonymous said...

A genuine example!

Dave said...

That's a very long way to go for a pun.

It's hard out there for a pun!

angrylil'asiangirl said...

it's one of those jokes that's so bad you have to grimace and groan more from sheer pain than from good humor.

Dr Dume said...

I'm still working on how to pronounce 'genre'. It's easier to pronounce the word verifications.

I'll worry about what it means later.

Euclid Me Not said...

The shortest distance between two puns is a straight-line.