3.07.2007

Time and Desire march to different drummers

Dear Miss Snark,

A few months ago, a couple of agents requested my full manuscript. I've heard nothing since. I've been perusing the comments on your blog. It seems that if a lot of time passes without word, it's highly unlikely that an agent is going to suddenly read/want the book. Am I correct?


No

10 comments:

amy said...

I'm in a similar position, and I'd love to hear some Snarklings' experiences. After submitting a full, how long have you had to wait for a rejection? For an offer of representation? Were there some people whom you never heard back from at all?

Anonymous said...

I've had an agent request the full, keep it for many months, and when contacted eventually for followup, gave no reply -- it seemed safe to assume the person was not interested. Another agent requested a full just before the holidays, so I'm adding an extra month onto expected wait time, and it's a long ms., so adding on for that too -- and will be patient until I hear back. Meanwhile I'm preparing another batch of queries to send out for the next round.
Waiting is hard, but it helps to put energies into revisions that will make your ms. the best it can be, and working on something new, and sending out stories to litmags.
Faulkner said, "And sure enough, waiting will end ... if you can just wait long enough."

~Nancy said...

Amy,

I've seen on writers' boards (as I'm not at that stage - yet!) that typical response (yay or nay) can go from a few hours (if the agent uses email) to a few weeks to a few months wait. And, unfortunately, there are a number of agents who never reply.

Good luck!

~JerseyGirl

Anonymous said...

Don't wait for the rejection, keep subbing unless you agreed to an exclusive!

Chris said...

Amy: I submitted my full on 20 June, and got the rejection on September 28. I gave them three calendar months because I'd read somewhere that you really are entitled to contact them after that time with an oh-so-polite inquiry.

The next year I rewrote, and sent it back to the same agency (I asked them first and they said ok). I sent it on April 18, and three months later on July 18 I PHONED them to get the bad news. The agent said sorry, but she hadn't had the time to read it yet...

On August 7 she finally got back to me with 3 pages of suggestions. One thing led to another, and on November 28 (after several rounds of improvements) she offered to represent my first novel.

So, from requesting the first version of the full on June 20, 2005, to offering representation on November 28, 2006 was 17 months.

Hang in there kiddo - unless you've got a close relative who happens to be a commissioning editor at a major publisher, you're in for a bit of a slog, but you'll get there if you don't quit...

Good luck!

Anonymous said...

I've been waiting six months to hear back from a New York publisher. I met the editor at a conference and she asked for the full.
I queried sixty agents. Thirteen of which did not reply. One replied nine months later, three seven months later, another took ten months to respond.
Getting published is a waiting game. They keep us waiting. We adhere to their deadlines, and don't dare keep them waiting. But if we want to see our name on the spine of a book, we play by their rules.

Maggie Stiefvater said...

Oh man! Sixty agents? Is that what people usually do? If so, I am soo behind the game with my pitiful list that I'm looking at sending to . . .

Grendel's Dam said...

I once had a requested full returned after four years. No note. Just my manuscript, neatly boxed.

Anonymous said...

One of writer friends queried 100 agents before she finally landed one. And her book will be released in a couple of months. Never give up.

Demon Hunter said...

Amy, I'm kinda like Chris. An agent read my first 3 chapters, asked for changes, and now she's reading the full. Plus, she told me that she would not get back with me as quickly as she did with my first 3 chapters--turnaround was 1 week. So, hang in there and keep subbing!